Sponsored by
Place your ad banner here.
Contact info@goanvoice.ca
 
Newsletter. Issue 2004-08. April. 17, 2004
Printer Friendly Version
 
Newsline Canada
News Clips From Goa
Goan Voice UK
People Places and Things
Events
Obituary
Announcement
Health & Wellness
 
Classified Adverts
Subscribe to Goan Voice
Contact Us
Links & Reference Section
Newsletter Archives
 
Newsline Canada
News Clips From Goa
Goan Voice UK
People Places and Things
Events
Obituary
Health & Wellness
 
Classified Adverts
Subscribe to Goan Voice
Contact Us
Links & Reference Section
Newsletter Archives


 


Newsline Canada

It's All Happening in Toronto
The arrival of Spring has resurrected the Goan Community with a full programme of social and cultural events taking place over the next few months.
Here are a few:-
April 17 - Easter Dance organized by the Friends Club in Mississauga with dancing to the sounds of PAVE CONNECTION & DJ FATZ
April 23 - A new Seniors Group (55+) serving the East Toronto area will be holding their first meeting for enrolment of members and election of an executive committee. This will be the first of many events planned for 2004. A similar group will soon be formed in the West Toronto area covering Mississauga and Brampton, the fastest growing suburbs in Canada.
April 24 - "THAT'S WHAT FRIENDS ARE FOR" will be holding a fund raising dinner-dance for Alison De Silva (now in recovery from a rare medical disorder) to help in much-needed equipment and home care.Alison herself will be attending the event in the Brampton area which will feature a band, DJ, and live entertainment.
April 25- G.O.A. AGM . Usually a "Ho Hum" event, but this year expect high praise for the executive for paring down "the property debt" to less than $100K. The unspoken issue - "to sell, or not to sell, the property" will receive the fale, fale, treatment, with attention turning to the 34th Anniversary Dance on May 1st where members will pay half the going rate for a sit-down dinner/dance.
May 22 - Make no mistake, Konkani Tiatr is still around. The entire cast of "Chukh" popular Konkanni drama staged thrice to rave reviews in London, England, will be flying in to perform at the Stephen Leacock Collegiate Institute in Scarborough. Producer is Francis D'Costa with MC Jr. Menezes.
The usual Village Feasts - Margao –Saligao - Aldona - Siolim will continue to be celebrated.
For details of these and the above events visit: www.goanvoice.ca
To list your event send plain text e-mal (no fliers) to info@goanvoice.ca

New Canadians realize their dream of home ownership sooner
- Immigrants are more likely to be planning to move or purchase a new home in the next year than their Canadian-born counterparts -
Excerpts: TORONTO, April 14 /CNW/ - Immigrants who came to Canada after 1980 are able to purchase their first home here faster than their predecessors could, according to a recent CIBC telephone poll conducted by Decima Research.
Among immigrants who are current homeowners, those who arrived prior to 1980 took, on average, fifteen years to purchase their first home. This time frame has shrunk to less than six years among immigrants who have arrived since 1980.
"The dream of home ownership has become reality sooner for new Canadians who currently own a home," said Paul Mims, Vice President, CIBC Mortgages and Lending. "We also found that the older immigrants are when they arrive, the sooner they are able to purchase their first home."
Immigrants who arrive in Canada between the ages of 18 and 34 take an average of 8.9 years to purchase their first home. In contrast, it takes less than half as long (just over four years) for immigrants who arrive between the ages of 35 and 49 to purchase their first home.

Recognition of foreign credentials given a boost
TORONTO, April 13, 2004 -- An important step was taken today to improve the recognition of foreign credentials in Canada. The Honourable Jean Augustine, Minister of State (Multiculturalism and Status of Women), announced Government of Canada funding of $977,876 for two projects that will help immigrants to Canada, and Canadians trained abroad, find work in their field of expertise.
"Canada is one of the most diverse countries in the world. We need to take full advantage of the skills and knowledge that immigrants and foreign-trained Canadians bring to the table," said Minister of State Augustine."This is not just an issue for immigrants or foreign-trained Canadians; it affects all Canadians. Our entire country suffers when skilled people are prevented from working and participating in our economy and our society."
For further information see: http://www.canadianheritage.gc.ca/newsroom/news_e.cfm

Canadians found work faster than most other countries in 2003
Job search will take longer in 2004

TORONTO, April 8 /CNW/ - A new global study says unemployed workers in Canada found new employment faster than in most other countries during 2003.
The study's authors warn it will take Canadians longer to find a new job this year as the pace of job creation slows.
The annual Career Transition Study by global human resource consulting firm DBM shows unemployed Canadians found new employment in an average time of 2.5 months last year. A follow-up survey of DBM career transition professionals in 17 Canadian cities in March this year indicates that average job search time lengthened in the first quarter as job creation slowed. They estimate it could take Canadians an average of four months to find new employment this year.
The Canadian economy generated almost one million new jobs since 2001, but full-time job growth has slowed this year according to Statistics Canada's monthly Labor Force Survey. Canada's unemployment rate is 7.5 per cent.

Other highlights from the DBM's 2003 Career Transition Study include:
- 51 per cent of unemployed Canadians surveyed found new full-time employment compared to a global average of 59 per cent; 14 per cent opted for self-employment compared to 17 per cent worldwide
- 10 per cent of Canadian respondents took temporary or part-time positions; nine per cent were re-hired by their previous employer. Others returned to school, retired or remained unemployed
- Eight per cent of Canadian respondents lost their jobs in 2003 as a result of a plant closing, up from one per cent in 2002. Seventy-three per cent of Canadian respondents lost their employment as a result of downsizing or organizational restructuring
- The number of females losing employment in Canada increased to 43 per cent from 38 per cent the year previous according to the study.

DBM consultants across Canada attribute slower job creation this year to outsourcing and the increase in the value of Canadian currency compared to the U.S. dollar. They say professional and financial services and high technology industries will produce the most new jobs this year.
"The relatively short job search time in Canada last year is logical given the strong pace of job growth in the last two years. It follows that job search time will increase this year as the pace of job growth slows," said John Withenshaw, Senior Vice-President, Operations, DBM Canada.
"Canadians who lose their jobs this year would be well-advised to prepare for a longer job search time and to manage their severance and other funds appropriately. It would also be prudent to consider part-time or contract opportunities as desirable employment options. Creating different versions of a resume for full-time, part-time or contract possibilities is a good idea to present yourself in the most desirable way possible," he added.
A complimentary summary of DBM's 2003 global Career Transition Study is available at www.dbmcanada.com.

Canada and British Columbia Sign New Immigration Agreement
VANCOUVER, April 5 /CNW/ - Judy Sgro, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, and Murray Coell, Minister of Community, Aboriginal and Women's Services for British Columbia, signed a new immigration agreement today.
The agreement establishes a framework for the governments of Canada and British Columbia to develop new initiatives to meet regional immigration needs, improve the integration of immigrants, encourage foreign students to choose British Columbia and address barriers to the recognition of foreign credentials. Key elements of the original agreement signed in 1998 remain, including a commitment by British Columbia to design and deliver settlement services and participate in the Provincial Nominee Program, which gives provinces and territories the authority to identify and nominate immigrants to fill their specific regional and local needs.


Goan Voice designed and compiled by Goacom Insys Pvt. Ltd., Goa
Campal Trade Centre, Next to Military Hospital, Campal, Panjim, Goa-403001
Tel: +91 832 2225207, 2424578 Email: jjds@primus.ca